DNFA #4– FIVE QUESTIONS TO STEFANO GRIMALDI

Today we are happy to host Stefano Grimaldi (Italy), archaeologist, Associated Professor at Università degli studi di Trento (Trento, Italia) and President of the Istituto Italiano di Paleontologia Umana (Anagni, Italia).
We interviewed him in 2015 for the Italian magazine “Montagne 360” (Club Alpino Italiano) and today he is our host for the Do Not Feed the Archaeologists’ project!

Stefano Grimaldi, archaeologist

Why did you choose to become an archaeologist?
SG: Archaeology have chosen me. I started Economy and Finance studies but after three years I decided it was not for me. By chance some friends invited me to re-start my studies at the Humanities faculty (they were different times, by the way… we were not still addicted to technology, so we needed to talk with people to get information, ideas, …) and after a while I met the professor who became my teacher in archaeology. The more I studied with him, the more Archaeology embraced me.

When did you understand that it was the right or the wrong choice?
SG: Never! I am still figuring out; but I do not think this is the problem. More than a choice it was a good chance to live a life dedicated to what I really like: to travel around the world in order to have a larger glimpse over modern humanity.

Sometimes during hard times, we think about giving up…You did not! You are still an active archaeologist! Why? I mean, what happened? Do you have a special “mantra” helping your balance, or did you have to struggle with someone convincing this person that going on was the best choice? Who? Your relatives? Yourself?… The final question is “what is your secret to keep on digging?”
SG: Digging is fascinating, it is an exciting intellectual and physical activity. The boring side of our profession is bureaucracy. About one-third (probably more) of my working time is dedicated to fulfill endless forms, to discuss to administrative officials, to write complex reports just to have the permit to buy a simple pencil.

Stefano Grimaldi in an “off record” picture taken on the field!

How do you pass your spare time during the digging evenings (anyway while you are off from digging, but still far from home?)
SG:

There is no free time during the excavation time. After digging, we back home and, while someone prepare the meal for everybody, other people wash and clean the archaeological findings; after dinner, we check the documentation, draw the artefacts, and so on until midnight or later; at five a.m. we are ready for another excavation day…
OK! this is the situation that any field director is dreaming about. The truth is to have a pint of beer during a night out with the students.

Let’s suppose that you were not an archaeologist… what is your job? policeman, farmer, batman?…
SG: No way! It is very hard stuff to answer. But in my dreams… I have not a job: I am a prehistoric hunter!..

Thank you!

Categories: DNFA_2020 | Tags: , , , | Commenti disabilitati su DNFA #4– FIVE QUESTIONS TO STEFANO GRIMALDI

DNFA #3 – Five questions to Ernesto Piana

It’s high time to read Prof. Ernesto Piana (Argentina) retired archaeologist, former main researcher at CADIC/Conicet in Ushuaia and former Director of the Archaeological Project “Canal Beagle”. We visited him in October 2011, during “Ande 2011” project and we published plenty of posts thanks to his “lessons”!

1) Why did you chose to become an archaeologist?

EP: It looked to be a better than a bank cashier life. And also I was a country boy and archaeologists are the evolution of the field trackers. Reading more traces than formulas or papers.

2) When did you understand that it was the right or the wrong choice?

EP: AFTER RETIREMENT. Key word in this tricky question is the past tense “was”.  All along my career I asked myself “is this the right choice”. Only now I may  question “was it”.

Prof. Ernesto Piana during an hike – 2019

3) Sometimes during hard times we think about giving up…You did not! You are still an active archaeologist! Why? I mean, what happened? Do you have a special “mantra” helping your balance, or did you have to struggle with someone convincing this person that going on was the best choice? Who? Your relatives? Yourself?… The final question is “what is your secret to keep on digging?”
EP: I am retired but keep active. Why to keep researching? Main reason, curiosity. Second reason, because archaeology is the routine of astonishment. The other 98 reasons are too many to be detailed. Why to keep going to field work at 71 years old? Because of old students and other archaeologist invitations. And to have a friendly wine by the camps fire.

4) How do you pass your spare time during the digging evenings (anyway while you are off from digging, but still far from home?)
EP: Is there time to spare during field seasons? After hour of diggings includes conditioning the findings, go over the day’s recordings, cutting wood for fire, tent order, cleaning equipment, food preparing, discuss on the out comings, the blooming data and next day’s planning. But mainly having fun.

Prof. Ernesto Piana hiking in the mountains – 2019

5) Let’s suppose that you were not an archaeologist.. what is your job? policeman, farmer, batman?..
Graphic humorist. Or to be a land owner. A couple acres would be enough,… if being around the “Fontana di Trevi”!

Thank you, Ernesto!

Categories: DNFA_2020 | Tags: , , , , | Commenti disabilitati su DNFA #3 – Five questions to Ernesto Piana

DNFA #2 – Five questions to Bruce Bradley

Today let’s read Prof. Bruce Bradley (USA) – anthropologist and Emeritus Professor / University of Exeter – Department of Archaeology. He was mentioned in Arkeomount.com in 2012 when he published the book “Across Atlantic Ice” together with Dott. Dennis Stanford (Smithsonian Institution – Washington, D.C.). Today he is part of our Do Not Feed the Archaeologists! project!
Bruce runs also a great blog: check out www.primtech.rocks !

Prof. Bruce Bradley in Beijing – 2019

1) Why did you choose to become an archaeologist?

BB: From a very young age I was fascinated with things “Indian”, especially arrowheads and other ‘relics’. I was also keen on snakes, lizards, frogs and other small beasties and of course, like many kids- rocks. I was fortunate to be in a family that encouraged these interests and made opportunities to explore. The one key passion I had was wanting to make arrowheads but try as I might this eluded me until I was in High School. Our family moved from Michigan, where visibility of artifacts was very low to the Arizona desert where they were almost everywhere I looked. When I was ready to enroll in University, I wanted to become a herpetologist, but the science requirements were overwhelming. So, I decided on archaeology (anthropology). That was the beginning, and I am still at it.

2) When did you understand that it was the right or the wrong choice?
BB: I knew is was right from the day I realized I could make it my life’s path.

3)Sometimes during hard times, we think about giving up…You did not! You are still an active archaeologist! Why? I mean, what happened? Do you have a special “mantra” helping your balance, or did you have to struggle with someone convincing this person that going on was the best choice? Who? Your relatives? Yourself?… The final question is “what is your secret to keep on digging?”
BB: I have never lost my passion for discovery- things, ideas, people, places, etc. Archaeology has provided it all.

prof. Bruce Bradley in Brazil – 2016

4) How do you pass your spare time during the digging evenings (anyway while you are off from digging, but still far from home?)
BB. Most places I when go ‘on the road’ it is because I am either giving a knapping workshop or working on a research project where experimental archaeology is a primary method. So, I can usually be found busting rocks. When not doing that I enjoy the challenges of sport fishing. Check out my web page www.primtech.rocks

5) Let’s suppose that you were not an archaeologist.. what is your job? policeman, farmer, batman?..
BB: I can imagine I would have knuckled down and done the science to become a herpetologist. If that hadn’t happened, probably a stone mason.

Thank you, Bruce!

Categories: DNFA_2020 | Tags: , , , | Commenti disabilitati su DNFA #2 – Five questions to Bruce Bradley

DNFA #1 – Five questions to Teresa Michieli

Prof. Teresa Michieli (Argentina) – archaeologist and former director of “Prof. Mariano Gambier” Museum in San Juan (Argentina), is the first hosted in this series of post related to the 2020 project “Do not feed the archaeologists!”. Prof. Michieli supported a lot “Ande 2011” project, nearly 10 years ago, leading us in the area of San Juan for one incredible week! Let’s know her better reading her 5 answers!

Prof. Teresa Michieli at Los Morillos cave (Ande 2011)


1) Why did you chose to become an archaeologist?

TM: I always liked research (about anything, I was a very curious girl and fanatically reading). When I studied archaeology in the Bachelor’s degree in History (early 1970s) I started to like the subject, but inside
I supposed it would be difficult to face it as a woman.
One class consisted of visiting a facility from the Inca period that was in excavation and there they allowed me to delve into a corner with the good luck that I found two ceramic shards. I ran to my archaeology professor and he I asked if that was Inca pottery and he answered yes. So I said, half in serious and half joking: “Ah! It means that I can be an archaeologist. ” I turned around and when I returned to my place the teacher said to me: “Are you serious?” I stayed motionless, still and surprised for a moment wondering inside me if he had really been serious. And I realized that it was so.
From then on I started working with said teacher until I received my degree and, because of his contacts, I came to San Juan where I continue working after 45 years.

2) When did you understand that it was the right or the wrong choice?
TM: When I graduated from university and moved, at 23, to live and work in another province with a great archaeologist (Mariano Gambier) and a great field for this activity, I felt it was the right choice and I have kept that taste and that same curiosity through the years.

3) Sometimes during hard times we think about giving up…You did not! You are still an active archaeologist! Why? I mean, what happened? Do you have a special “mantra” helping your balance, or did you have to struggle with someone convincing this person that going on was the best choice? Who? Your relatives? Yourself?… The final question is “what is your secret to keep on digging?”
TM: No, I did not give up, even in difficult times due to the complexity of the geography in where I worked or due to management and protection problems of the archaeological heritage while I was in charge of the Research Institute. Now retired, I am still an active archaeologist, although now with less haste and less responsibility, enjoying more free time and meetings with colleagues and friends.
I did not have to convince anyone of my decision. Both relatives and bosses and friends understood my choice and dedication perfectly well and even they accompanied and helped when necessary.
There is no secret to continue working in archaeology; is simply the interest in the subject and the eternal curiosity that appears when it presents something unthinkable and that manages to bring me back to the enthusiasm of my youth.

Prof. Teresa Michieli – 2019

4) How do you pass your spare time during the digging evenings (anyway while you are off from digging, but still far from home?)
TM: When I was young, in the long afternoons of isolated months in the high mountains, I used to knitting, generally small things because the transfer in horses does not allowed to carry a lot of luggage.
Currently, with another type of infrastructure and technology within reach, use my iPad to communicate with my family and stay up-to-date with news from the world.

5) Let’s suppose that you were not an archaeologist.. what is your job? policeman, farmer, batman?..

TM: If I had not been an archaeologist and historian, perhaps I would have been struck criminology … although I also always dreamed of being a writer (and although I am not able to write fiction, with the narrative of archaeology and history I have fulfilled part of my dream).

Prof. Michieli with Veronica and Massimo at Museo Gambier in 2011

Thank you Teresa!

Categories: DNFA_2020, Senza categoria | Tags: , , , , , , | Commenti disabilitati su DNFA #1 – Five questions to Teresa Michieli

Tombe megalitiche con dromos: primi strumenti all’osservazione stellare? Di certo non erano solo tombe. Uno studio apre la questione.

Cova de Daina- Andalusia (Spain) - foto Arkeomount

Finalmente qualcuno ci ha pensato. E ci sta facendo uno studio serio. Alcune costruzioni megalitiche, poi passate alla storia come tombe (perché così le abbiamo classificate) potrebbero essere state costruzioni con scopi diversi. Innanzitutto uno strumento per osservare il cielo, o meglio per consentire all’uomo di potenziare la propria vista al fine di scrutare meglio i copri celesti. Ma anche un luogo di iniziazione, in cui la connessione terra-cielo giocava un ruolo primario. E forse, aggiungiamo noi, un luogo di cura spirituale, e per sostenere questa nostra ipotesi, aggiungiamo a quanto riportiamo in seguito, il ricordo della pratica della incubazione che si prevedeva nei tempi antichi (diciamo almeno dall’età del Bronzo) la consuetudine a riposare al buio per tre giorni e tre notti al fine di ricevere un sogno rivelatore e guaritore. Anche nel medioevo questa pratica era usata. E non vi erano per forza costruzioni ad hoc, ma si usavano architetture i cui scopi erano altri, come i pozzi. Ricordiamo ad esempio il feroce tiranno Orsini che a Pitigliano (GR) faceva tale pratica prima di ogni battaglia, rifugiandosi nel pozzo del palazzo oggi detto Orsini.
Ma veniamo alla news. Uno studente inglese in Scienze e Tecnologie alla Nottingham Trent University, tale Kieran Simcox, ha proposto e ottenuto di iniziare una ricerca sulle tombe megalitiche, indagando in particolare quelle con struttura a tumulo o comunque dotate di un dromos (corridoio stretto e lungo che porta alla tomba a camera costruita con grandi blocchi ad incastro). L’ipotesi è che la pratica potesse consistere nel rimanere sdraiati all’interno della “tomba” e godere da quella posizione solo della porzione di cielo che l’apertura tra le pietre consentiva. La news che riportiamo da sciencedaily.com sottolinea come questa ricerca ipotizzi che i tali siti possano “essere stati usati per riti di passaggio, dove gli iniziati avrebbero dovuto passare la notte all’interno della tomba, senza luce naturale.
L’idea alla base è che la struttura della “tomba” possa essere stata uno strumento per l’osservazione del cielo: “E’ una sorpresa che nessuno abbia studiato a fondo la questione”, ha dichiarato il futuro dott. Simcox. Ad esempio, sottolinea lo stesso studioso, bisogna considerare l’impatto che ha il colore del cielo notturno sulla retina, e su quanto questo aspetto determini ciò che l’occhio nudo riesce a vedere.
Ne è nato un progetto seguito anche dalla Università gallese di Trinity Saint David che inizierà la sua analisi da siti portoghesi come quello di Seven-Stone Antas datato al 6000 BP. Il Dr Fabio Silva, a capo del team, intende investigare la correlazione con la stella Aldebaran, nella costellazione del Toro, che forse era un marcatore annuale o stagionale. La sua apparizione poteva aiutare a decidere quando iniziare una migrazione, il pascolo o la semina. Teniamo conto che la stessa stella non sarebbe visibile ad occhio nudo, ma sarebbe invece visibile per chi dovesse trascorrere una intera notte al buio della tomba. Insomma, il buio allena l’occhio, aiuta la mente e lo spirito. Conoscere ed applicare questo aspetto è da considerarsi a tutti gli effetti una tecnologia.

Categories: Senza categoria | Commenti disabilitati su Tombe megalitiche con dromos: primi strumenti all’osservazione stellare? Di certo non erano solo tombe. Uno studio apre la questione.

A breve sarà analizzato nei dettagli un cervello Sapiens del Paleolitico

La grotta - Immagine tratta da belparcodelpollino.com

Questa è una breve news, un flash diremmo. Abbiamo appena intercettato su Repubblica una news davvero interessante che segnala come grazie ad un software Californiano sarà possibile ricostruire in 3D il cervello di un nostro antenato di 17mila anni fa.

La ricerca parte da una ricerca italiana, a cura di Fabio Martini, archeologo dell’Università di Firenze.

Il reperto base  è costituito dai resti di un bambino morto a soli 10 anni di vita e ritrovati nella Grotta del Romito, in Calabria. La news riporta le parole dello scienziato: “Attraverso l’utilizzo di tecnologie informatiche molto avanzate, dei software specifici che sono stati elaborati all’Università della California, è stato possibile ricostruire in 3D il cervello del bambino.Stiamo conducendo studi con tecnologie avanzate, come le costruzioni 3D e la scannerizzazione 3D (…). Per la prima volta c’è un prodotto attendibile sicuro che ci indica come era fatto un cervello di 17mila anni fa. E’ una scoperta sensazionale”.

Attendiamo curiosi.

Categories: Antropologia, Archeologia | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Commenti disabilitati su A breve sarà analizzato nei dettagli un cervello Sapiens del Paleolitico

Gli sciamani Ikaro dell’Amazzonia peruviana divengono patrimonio culturale nazionale

Tratta da http://songoftheamazon.com/

Mercoledi 22 giugno la Gazzetta ufficiale Peruviana (Diario Oficial)ha pubblicato la risoluzione ministeriale del 15 giugno 2016 n° 068-2016-VMPCIC-MC che fa seguito alla carta presentata il 4 novembre 2015 dal direttore del Programma de Diversidad Cultural y Economia Amazonica del Instituto de Investigaciones .

Con questo documento Il Ministero della Cultura del Peru ha dichiarato gli Ikaros (Shipibo Konibo xetebo) “Patrimonio Culturale della Nazione”, in quanto elemento trasversale della cultura Amazzonica ed espressione di un rapporto intimo e armonico con la natura che impone di imparare dalla natura ascoltandola.

Gli Shipibo-Konibo-xetebo sono una delle più grandi popolazioni indigene dell’Amazzonia peruviana. Si compone di circa 32.000 persone, raggruppati in circa 150 comunità organizzate nei dipartimenti di Loreto, Madre de Dios, Huanuco e, soprattutto, Ucayali. La “Nacion” Shipibo-Konibo-xetebo appartiene alla etno – famiglia linguistica Pano e i suoi abitanti parlano la lingua madre Shipibo-Konibo. Come suggerisce il nome, e come detto il famoso antropologo, Jacques Tournon, questa Nacion è il prodotto di una fusione  etnica e della cooperazione culturale tra il popolo Shipibo, Konibo e quello Xetebo. Presenza fondamentale di questa cultura è la figura dell’Ikaro, lo sciamano.

La sua medicina consiste basicamente in canti sacri (Kene) che vengono riprodotti in momenti salienti della crescita e nei momenti iniziatici ma anche in attività quotidiane come la pesca e la caccia. Il canto di un Ikaro è composto da vibrazioni sonore che si credono di guarigione in quanto capaci di trasformare la persona o l’oggetto che investono. Si riconoscono tre dimensioni del canto: quella spirituale energetica, quella musicale

E ‘possibile perdistinguere tre dimensioni che fanno parte della struttura di Ikaro xetebo Shipibo-konibo-; Energia o dimensione spirituale è la forza immanente spirituale per Ikaro. E ‘l’energia vibrazionale che trascende dal sciamano di un oggetto o una persona che riceve la canzone. La persona ikareada armonizza l’integrazione di corpo e mente, grazie alle  forze e gli spiriti della natura. Il paziente diventa magnetizzato, protetto e guarito. Nelle cerimonie con piante sacre –ad esempio – è fondamentale che prima dell’ingestione della medicina essa venga “cantata”, così che gli spiriti protettori possano apparire e proteggere/guidare il processo di guarigione. L’atto ministeriale è stato firmato dal vice ministro per i Beni culturali e le industrie culturali, Juan Pablo de La Puente Brunke.

Categories: Ande, Antropologia, Peru | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Commenti disabilitati su Gli sciamani Ikaro dell’Amazzonia peruviana divengono patrimonio culturale nazionale

L’uomo di Dmanisi: in Georgia la prima specie ominide europea?

Il sito di Dmanisi_teschio - Foto Ambasciata Georgiana

Sono mesi roventi per il dibattito paleoantroplogico. Dopo la scoperta dell’Homo di Naledi in una caverna vicino Johannesburg (si veda l’articolo pubblicato su eLife- https://elifesciences.org/content/4/e09560: ben 1.500 fossili per uno dei più importanti ritrovamenti di una singola specie di ominide di sempre), ecco che il sito georgiano di Dmanisi si sta affermando nella comunità scientifica internazionale come quello che ha riportato alla luce la più antica specie ominide europea. A marzo, a Roma, si è tenuta una giornata dedicata alla Georgia, durante la quale il Prof. David Lordkipanidze, archeologo georgiano di fama internazionale, ha dichiarato: “abbiamo scoperto scheletri umani risalenti a 1,8 milioni di anni fa, ciò significa che il genere umano ha lasciato l’Africa quasi 1 milione di anni prima di quanto pensassimo e questo ha destato enorme sorpresa tra gli scienziati; stiamo cambiando la visione sull’evoluzione del nostro genere: gli uomini erano molto più primitivi quando hanno cominciato a colonizzare il mondo e possiamo dire che in diverse parti del pianeta esistessero generi umani differenti ma con molte caratteristiche simili” (citazione dal comunicato stampa a noi inviato). Lo studioso ha concluso ricordando che i resti ritrovati sono i più antichi mai scoperti fuori dall’Africa.
Dmanisi si torva nel sud del paese, a soli 85 km da Tbilisi ed era una città medievale posta su una collina. Proprio uno scavo nelle rovine dell’antica città, hanno portato nel 1983 alla scoperta fortuita di un sedimento risalente al Pleistocene contenente principalmente ossa animali. Successivamente anche utensili di roccia e ossa di ominidi sono venute alla luce. Grazie a tecniche radiometriche gli archeologi hanno datato i resti che erano immediatamente sopra uno strato di roccia vulcanica che è certamente di 1,85 milioni di anni fa. Successivi sutdi paleo magnetici hanno datato i resti immediatamente superiori a quelli vulcanici a 1,77 milioni di anni. A questa epoca dunque risalirebbero anche le ossa degli ominidi che vi giacevano. Un ulteriore attestato di questa datazione p fornito dal fatto che nello stesso strato stavano anche i resti di un roditore (detto Mimomide) che ha abitato quelle terre esclusivamente tra 1,6 e 2 milioni di anni fa. Lo studio che ha accompagnato la relazione dell’archeologo georgiano sottolinea come per lungo tempo gli scienziati hanno pensato ai primi ominidi fuori dall’Africa come ad una tipologia in possesso di un grande cervello e di una statura approssimativamente vicina a quella dell’Uomo Antomicamente Moderno.

Il cranio D3444 - Foto Ambasciata Georgiana

Si pensava che questo primo gruppo avesse messo piede fuori dal continente africano circa 1 milione di anni fa , quando la sua evoluzione – anche in termini di strumentazione – gli permetteva un tale passo. Ma il sito di Dmanisi – con i resti di 5 teschi, 4 mandibole e un centinaio di ossa craniche – ci offe una visione nuova ed è la “più ricca e più completa collezione di resti Homo da un solo sito in un simile e comparabile contesto stratigrafico”. Come ha sottolineato il presidente dell’Associazione Scudo di San Giorgio, Lelio Orsini d’Aragona, che ha organizzato l’incontro di Roma: “Il teschio numero 5 di Dmanisi riassume in sé caratteristiche erroneamente ritenute indicative di quattro specie diverse di homo: habilis, ergaster, rudolfensis ed erectus, quindi la potenza di questa scoperta è determinata dal fatto che questi ominidi, che prima venivano collocati in un lasso temporale molto distante l’uno dall’altro, si sono trovati riuniti nello stessa specie, nello stesso periodo storico e nella medesima società”.

Il sito di Dmanisi_1 - Foto Ambasciata Georgiana

Era presente anche il noto paleoantropologo francese Prof. Yves Coppens che nel 1974 era nel team che scoprì i resti della famosa Lucy. Il comunicato stampa purtroppo riporta solo una sua battuta, ovvero “l’uomo è uomo non appena si fa uomo; con lui emerge l’aspetto cognitivo, tecnologico, intellettuale, estetico, etico e religioso; l’homo religiosus ha 3 milioni di anni”.
Tornando al cosiddetto Homo Georgicus, ricordiamo che è dal 2013- anno di pubblicazione di un famoso articolo su Science –  che il suo studio ha aperto un nuovo scenario. Si legga questo articolo di National Geographic (http://www.nationalgeographic.it/scienza/2013/10/18/news/il_cranio_che_sta_rivoluzionando_la_storia_dell_uomo-1854146/) dal quale traiamo alcuni spunti per concludere il nostro pezzo. In pratica, “Skull 5  presenta caratteristiche primitive. Ha una scatola cranica piccola, il volto allungato, la mascella superiore quasi scimmiesca, grandi denti. Tutti elementi che rimandano alle antiche specie africane. Gli altri crani, invece, mostravano caratteristiche che richiamavano quelle del più moderno Homo erectus, asiatico”. Dopo analisi alla TAC si è definito che i cinque individui georgiano presentano allo stesso tempo caratteristiche antiche e moderne. Il quesito dunque è “a quale specie vanno attribuiti gli umani di Dmanisi?”
Le variazioni di caratteristiche riscontrate nei fossili non indicano che fossero di specie diverse, quindi sono una specie a sé, oppure sono Erectus. Ma se così fosse allora anche gli altri ominidi rispetto ai quali le variazioni sono minime, ovvero Rudolfensis ed Ergaster, sarebbero solo sottospecie di Erectus…

David Lordkipanidze mostra il teschio- foto di FrancescaFago

Ovvio scrivere che più scoperte consentono l’avanzamento della conoscenza, ma anche nel campo della paleoantropologia la difficoltà di una teoria univoca si sta iniziando ad affermare e le credenze quasi granitiche sulla teoria evoluzionistica stanno lasciando il passo a nuovi scenari, nei quali è sempre più difficile ingabbiare la vita.

 

Categories: Africa, Antropologia, Metodologia, Paleontologia, Primatologia | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Commenti disabilitati su L’uomo di Dmanisi: in Georgia la prima specie ominide europea?

Choquequirao, nuove indagini sulle Ande peruviane

Ci dispiace di non pubblicare troppo in questo periodo e ci ripromettiamo di essere più assidui a partire da questa estate. Nell’attesa di poter dedicare più tempo al blog, ci teniamo a pubblicare una breve nota dell’amico archeologo Gary Ziegler, che è appena tornato dal Peru per l’ennesimo viaggio esplorativo nella zona che più ama, ovvero Choquequirao. Questa volta si è dedicato – insieme ad altri 7 amici e colleghi – su alcune rovine che sono state identificate sulle cime che dominano il fiume Apurimac proprio in corrispondenza della citadella. Il tempo é stato clemente, ma pare che la salita sia stata difficile. Secondo Gary “non possiamo parlare di una nuova “Città Perduta”, ma restano comunque rovine da studiare attentamente”. Restiamo in attesa di un report – che ci è stato promesso – e nel frattempo pubblichiamo le straordinarie immagini che ci ha inviato!

La mappa dell'area - Immagine di Gary Ziegler

Immagine satellitare - di Gary Ziegler

Choquequirao - immagine di Gary Ziegler

Categories: Ande | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Commenti disabilitati su Choquequirao, nuove indagini sulle Ande peruviane

“Popoli estremi dall’Artico all’Himalaya”: conferenza e mostra da sabato a Bologna

Locandina ufficiale

Si apre questo sabato presso il Museo di Zoologia del Dipartimento di Scienze Biologiche, Geologiche e Ambientali (BiGeA) dell’Università di Bologna (via Selmi, 3),  un’esposizione fotografica dal titolo “Esplorazione, cooperazione e ricerca in Himalaya: Rolwaling la valle nascosta del popolo Sherpa”. Organizzata grazie all’Associazione italiana “Explora Nunaat International”, la rassegna si apre sabato 16 aprile alle ore 15.30 con la conferenza libera “Popoli estremi dall’Artico all’Himalaya” che si terrà sempre presso il Dipartimento BiGeA. Durante la Conferenza saranno presentate le attività di cooperazione intraprese con le comunità locali e i risultati preliminari degli studi antropologici e genomici condotti sulle popolazioni Sherpa.

Come recita il comunicato stampa ufficiale che ci ha inviato Davide Peluzzi, curatore della mostra insieme a Marco Sazzini, l’esposizione ha lo scopo di documentare le attività svolte in Nepal e in Artico di quattro spedizioni scientifico-umanitarie condotte da Explora Nunaat International in collaborazione con il Laboratorio di Antropologia Molecolare del Dipartimento BiGeA dell’Università di Bologna, primo ateneo nato in Italia. Le spedizioni oggetto della rassegna sono quattro: Saxum 2008, Earth Mater 2011, Gaurishankar 2013 ed Extreme Malangur 2015. Quest’ultima è l’unica spedizione italiana in Himalaya dopo il terremoto del 25 aprile 2015, le cui ricerche sono legate alla esistenza arcaica del Gigantopitecus in relazione all’attuale presenza delle grandi scimmie in Himalaya (a questo proposito approfondimenti in un prossimo post).
L’esposizione rimarrà aperta al pubblico fino al 31 maggio 2016. Per informazioni visitate il sito dell’Associazione Explora Nunaat International, che da anni opera nel campo scientifico e della cooperazione umanitaria in aree del Pianeta Terra considerate “selvagge”.

Categories: Metodologia, Primatologia | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Commenti disabilitati su “Popoli estremi dall’Artico all’Himalaya”: conferenza e mostra da sabato a Bologna